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Holocaust Memorial Day: Foundation Stones Workshop

Various times: Online

Dates/times

Wed 27 Jan
  • 1.30pm - 2.30pm
  • 7pm - 8pm

Paint a commemorative stone, read and share thoughts on the impacts of the Holocaust.

Join the Norfolk & Norwich Millennium Library on Zoom for Holocaust Memorial Day to paint a commemorative stone in a friendly group, read and share thoughts on the impacts of the Holocaust. 

To take part make sure you have a small stone (about the size of your hand) and some decorating materials - felt tips/paint/nail polish. We will share some themed reading during the event - which you are invited to come along to witness without painting a stone. All participants are invited to read from selected excerpts and share their thoughts. Spaces are limited so booking is essential. Please let us know if you can no longer attend the event so your ticket is allocated to another customer.

Your Zoom invitation will be sent out via email a day before the event.

Holocaust Memorial Day is the international day to remember the six million Jews murdered during the Holocaust, and millions of people murdered under Nazi Persecution and in the genocides which followed in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur.


The Foundation Stones project
Foundation Stones is a special project where people across the UK are invited to paint a commemorative stone that will become part of the UK Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre when it is built in London.It is inspired by the Jewish custom of laying stones on headstones of graves, and allows people to make a personal commitment to build a better future free from all forms of hatred.

People can dedicate their stone to the six million Jewish men, women and children murdered in the Holocaust or to other victims of Nazi persecution, including the Roma and Sinti people, members of the LGBTQ+ community and people with mental and physical disabilities.

People can also choose to dedicate their stone to the victims of subsequent genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur. Many people choose to decorate their stones with symbols of peace or words expressing hope for a better future.